From Farm to Canvas: Painting the Rural Landscape Slant

From Farm to Canvas: Painting the Rural Landscape Slant

I live in a very rural part of New York State surrounded by farms.

The landscape influences my work, but not always in the ways you might imagine. I pass this farm on a back road to the next town.

I have stopped a few times to photograph it. What I really love is how the corn crib looks in front of the silo.

Corn crib in front of silo

Corn crib in front of silo.

It is a curved grid in front of a curved grid. In this photo it appears quite abstract. I love a subject, that is completely real and seems completely abstract.

In the final painting I kept the grid on the right and added a grid from an industrial garage door in New York City on the left.

Again it would not surprise me if you could not determine the source of the image.

It was the contrast of the flat grid and the curved grid that propelled me.

It challenges one’s perception on several levels. The first being that I painted a perfectly representational painting that is utterly abstract.

The flatness on one side and the barely perceptible curve on the other challenges one’s sense of space. Both of these things create a subtle disruption for the viewer.

Silo, 64 inches x 94 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2014

“Silo”, 64 inches x 94 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2014, Private Collection, Houston.

Leslie Parke painting Silo

Painting “Silo”

Conversations with  Giotto

Conversations with Giotto

I’ve been having conversations with Giotto di Bondone [c. 1267 – 1337, born in Florence, Italy] since I was twelve years old and my class studied the Rennaissance. The conversation became obsessive when in 1987

I created a cycle of paintings recreating the paintings of the Arena Chapel on seven shaped canvases, the largest of which is 18 by 24 feet.  [You can see them here.]

"The Last Wall", oil on shaped canvas, 18 feet x 24 feet, 1987, by Leslie Parke. Painting on shaped canvases.

“The Last Wall”, oil on shaped canvas, 18 feet x 24 feet, 1987

There are three stories about Giotto. One is that as a child as he drew a sheep on a rock, Cimabue saw this and was impressed and invited him to become his apprentice.

Another is that one day while Cimabue was out Giotto painted a fly on Cimabue’s self portrait. It was so realistic Cimabue tried to whisk it away several times. Many years later, the fly became a symbol of the artist and was inserted frequently into Dutch still life paintings.

But it is the third story that has occupied me recently.

 Vasari [the chonicler of “Lives of the Artists”] relates that when the Pope sent a messenger to Giotto, asking him to send a drawing to demonstrate his skill, Giotto drew a red circle so perfect that it seemed as though it was drawn using a pair of compasses and instructed the messenger to send it to the Pope.

The messenger departed ill pleased, believing that he had been made a fool of. The messenger brought other artists’ drawings back to the Pope in addition to Giotto’s. When the messenger related how he had made the circle without moving his arm and without the aid of compasses the Pope and his courtiers were amazed at how Giotto’s skill greatly surpassed all of his contemporaries.[6] [Wikiwand]

This winter when I started to paint circles, of course I thought of Giotto, but never more so than when I began to draw them on a large canvas.

To do this I sort of dropped into a meditative state. If I thought too much about what I was doing my mind would interfere with my hand.

Conversations with Giotto, 46 inches x 94 inches, silver graphite and blackboard paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2018

Conversations with Giotto, 46 inches x 94 inches, silver graphite and blackboard paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2018

I used silver graphite so that the line would catch the light. Then I did this version:

"Silver LIght" , 46 inches x 94 inches, silver graphite and black gesso on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2018

“Silver LIght” , 46 inches x 94 inches, silver graphite and black gesso on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2018

I wanted a field that was made from a line.

I thought, had “the string theory” proven to be true, it might look like this. Here is a close up:

"Silver Light", detail

“Silver Light”, detail

How an encounter with an 18th century Japanese screen painting found its way into my work.

How an encounter with an 18th century Japanese screen painting found its way into my work.

Several years ago as I crossed the Mall in Washington on my way back to my hotel, I decided I had to duck into the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, part of the Smithsonian, and see the Asian work there. On display was the Price Collection, on loan from Los Angeles. The first piece I saw as I entered the exhibition was “Pine and Plum Trees in Snowstorm” by Katsu Jagyoku, the 18th Century Japanese artist.

The room was dimmed and soft light fell on an enormous screen with branches and falling snow. I felt completely enveloped by the piece. I had both a calm and emotional response to it, a feeling that has stayed with me to this day.

Jagyoku Katsu. "Pine and Plum Trees in Snowstorm," a/k/a "Crows and Plum Tree, Rabbits and Pine Trees in Snow ,"

Katsu Jagyoku. “Pine and Plum Trees in Snowstorm,” a/k/a “Crows and Plum Tree, Rabbits and Pine Trees in Snow ,”

Jagyoku Katsu. "Pine and Plum Trees in Snowstorm," a/k/a "Crows and Plum Tree, Rabbits and Pine Trees in Snow ,"

A representation of these screens on a computer cannot begin to give you the feeling of the atmosphere, nor the enormous scale of the pieces.

I was impressed by the way so much was conveyed with such an economy of means, and almost no color.

When I am shaken by a work of art like this, it will find its way into my work. The piece that was most directly affected by this experience is this one:

"Almond Tree - Light Through Rain", 72 inches x 96 inches, 4-parts,oil, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2017

“Almond Tree – Light Through Rain”, 72 inches x 96 inches, 4- parts, oil, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2017, Private Collection, Houston.

I chose to use the motif of the almond tree, which I have been working with for years, perecisely because I am so familiar with it. I can work with it freely. 

This time I painted it on several panels to give it the feeling of the Japanese screens. I limited the palette, as Katsu Jagyoku had. I preserved his scale and the mood of the original screen. What is impossible to see here is that I have used reflective paint that makes light bounce off the surface of the canvas and also changes with the light.

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The Start of “The Grid Project”

The Start of “The Grid Project”

All projects have their precedents, and The Grid Project is no exception. For many years I used photography as an aid to my painting. I kept looking for subjects that were more and more abstract. I want the image to take on a new meaning as an abstract construct that has nothing to do with the subject.  But I also want to retain in the image some of the things I explored in my painitngs: transparencies, translucencies, reflections,  and qualities of light.

Here are some samples:

Blue Column, 34 inches x 25.5 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2015

Blue Column, 34 inches x 25.5 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2015

 

"Tutti Fruiti", 34 inches x 24.5 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2015

“Tutti Fruiti”, 34 inches x 24.5 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2015

 

"Taut", 27.5 inches x 34 inches, archival ink-jet print of photograph, edition of 6, © Leslie Parke 2016

“Taut”, 27.5 inches x 34 inches, archival ink-jet print of photograph, edition of 6, © Leslie Parke 2016

I am also interested in structure:

Particle Wave, 25.5 inches x 34 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2016

Particle Wave, 25.5 inches x 34 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2016

 

"Green Fence", 25.5 inches x 34 inches, photograph, archival inkjet print, ©Leslie Parke 2017

“Green Fence”, 25.5 inches x 34 inches, photograph, archival inkjet print, ©Leslie Parke 2017

The question is, “Where do I go from here?” [to be continued]

The Print Project and It’s Aftermath

The Print Project and It’s Aftermath

Several years ago I decided that I wanted to do a set of lithographs based on a painting I did of an almond tree.  Having never made a lithograph before I thought I’d share the process with you and get your input along the way.

I made 4-plate lithograph, that I printed in different colors to represent different times of the day.

Leslie Parke, Almond Tree MorningAlmond Tree Biot, France, AfternoonAlmond Tree Biot France - Evening

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I took the separations and scanned them and made a digital version of the lithograph. With 4-scans, I was able to make each scan a different color. Being the art history nerd that I am I used this as an opportunity to explore the palettes used in some of my favorite paintings by some of my favorite artists — Van Gogh, Gerhard Richter and William Nicholson.

 

My image coming out of the printer.

Leslie Parke, Almond Tree New Version

The digital print being turned back into a painting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then used the digital rendering to inspire new paintings on canvas. In this process, it became clear that I didn’t just want to change the palette, I wanted to change everything about how I applied the paiint. I poured paint, and dripped it, I flung it and scaped it. I used brushes, and squeegees, and rags, and paint sticks, palette knives and my fingers. I used oil paint, enamel paint, metallic paint and highway glass.

What remained was as abstract image that was based in nature and had a certain quality of light.

And even then, I was not quite finished, I also went back to some of the lithographs and painted on them to further enhance the image.

This project started in 2008 and it isn’t quite finished. When people ask me how long it takes me to do a painting, I assume they are asking how long it takes to apply the paint — not how long it takes to conceive an idea, nurture it, modify it, deconstruct it and reinvent it.

This process is essential to me. It is not repeating an image, it is studying, investigating, and dissecting an image. And until I have discovered everything I can, I keep working on it.

“Almond Tree Morning”, 60 inches x 70 inches, oil, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2015

 

"Tree in Twilight", 67 inches x 96 inches, oil, enamel, metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2015

“Tree in Twilight”, 67 inches x 96 inches, oil, enamel, metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2015

 

"Almond Tree - Light Through Rain", 72 inches x 96 inches, 4-parts,oil, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2017

“Almond Tree – Light Through Rain”, 72 inches x 96 inches, 4- parts, oil, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2017

But now something new is bubbling up. And again it is something I don’t quite know how to go about. So, I thought this would be a good time to share my journey with you. I have a vague idea where I want to go with the new work, but no idea how I am going to get there. If you have any ideas, feel free to chime in. The new project is called The Grid Project and I’ll explain it to you in my next post.

The Queen’s Skirt

The Queen’s Skirt

"The Queen's Skirt", 65 Inches x 94 inches. oil, metallic paint on canvas.

“The Queen’s Skirt”, 65 Inches x 94 inches. oil, metallic paint on canvas, ©Leslie Parke 2018

One day I was moving paintings in the “gallery space” of my studio  and I heard the words, “French Revolution”. We had just been through a long spate of Trump tantrums and I believe it was that, as much as anything, that brought the French Revolution to mind. I love French history, and while I haven’t studied the Revolution in many years, I spent the afternoon in a revery of free association. I was working on some large paintings that are mostly abstract, but with a representational association. And I was using a lot of metallic paint. I decided that I wanted to paint one of those wide, diaphanous skirts worn by Marie-Antoinette. I found such a skirt misidentified as hers on Google.

The skirt was actually the wedding dress of Hedwig Elisabeth Charlotte of Holstein Gottorp. Mari-Antoinette’s wedding dress said to be made of a cloth of silver and covered with diamonds has not survived. It had all the qualities I was looking for — diaphanous, enormous, like a curtain on a stage, with layers and layers of labor-intensive lace.

As I started to paint this I thought of the French court and how a century before the Revolution Louis XIV declared, “L’état c’est moi!”.  “The State is Me!” He brought all the nobles to court, where he could keep his eye on them, and then he sent his minions to the provinces where they could corral the land profits for the State. This structure was unsustainable, as more and more of the wealth was concentrated at the top. While the Queen play-acted at being a simple shepherdess at her faux farm, her people were starving. Parallels mount as you look at our current situation.

I did not so much paint this picture as I attacked it. I flung paint at it and rubbed my hands in it. In the end came a shocking moment of beauty, like the sparkling glass of a broken vase. Should I have called the piece, “Vanitas”?