The River Runs Through It — Battenkill Inspired

The River Runs Through It — Battenkill Inspired

 

Several years ago The Crandall Library in Glens Falls, New York had an exhibition called. “Battenkill Inspired”. This year Hannah deGarmo started filming the people in that exhibition. All of us live on or near the river. I traverse it every day on my way to work. Finding how to  convey both the look and feeling of this river has preoccupied me for years.

 

"Battenkill Tapestry", 48 inches x 48 inches, © Leslie Parke 2006

“Battenkill Tapestry”, 48 inches x 48 inches, © Leslie Parke 2006

 

"Battenkill in Fall", 50 inches x 44 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2006, Private Collection, Houston.

“Battenkill in Fall”, 50 inches x 44 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2006, Private Collection, Houston.

 

 

"Light on Battenkill", 69 inches x 48 inches, Oil on Canvas, © Leslie Parke 2009, Private Collection, Houston, Texas

“Light on Battenkill”, 69 inches x 48 inches, Oil on Canvas, © Leslie Parke 2009, Private Collection, Houston, Texas

 

Morning Battenkill, 46 inches x 82 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2014

Morning Battenkill, 46 inches x 82 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2014

Abstract or Representational — Depends on the Source of the Light

Abstract or Representational — Depends on the Source of the Light

"Flying Saucers", 48 inches x 58 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2012

“Flying Saucers”, 48 inches x 58 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2012 Courtesy of Gremillion and Company, Fine Arts, Inc.

My painitngs are about  light. When I paint representationally and I am about the business of rendering light, I often choose a subject that is back lit. It seems to offer the most extensive and complex  qualities of light — light on a surface, passing through a surface, reflecting off of a surface, often highlighting transparency, translucency, reflection, or glitter. The most complete expression of this can be seen in my china paintings, although it occurs in most of my work.

Light on Battenkill, 69 inches x 48 inches, Oil on Canvas, © Leslie Parke 2009

“Light on Battenkill”, 69 inches x 48 inches, Oil on Canvas, © Leslie Parke 2009, Private Collection, Houston, Texas

But how do you get these qualities when you work abstractly? It’s not something I figured out all at once. It started when I was trying to paint the light that glitters off the surface of water. I used white paint, but it felt dull and did not leap off the surface of the canvas. Then I scapped the silver off of a CD and applied that, and that didn’t work either. As I drove home one rainy night I noticed how the stripe on the road reflected the light off my headlights and I thought — that’s what I need. I called the highway department and asked them if I could buy some reflective road paint. It’s not the paint that is reflective, he told me, its the beads of glass that we put in it, and with that he gave me the address of their supplier.

Later I came upon diamond dust, which is even better than highway glass for reflecting light, but I was unable to find a supplier. I used the highway glass to good effect in the river painting.

Almond Tree, Biot, by Leslie Parke

“Almond Tree, Biot”, 60 inches x 70 inches, oil on canvas, 2008 ©Leslie Parke 2008, Private Collection, Houston

Then I was working on a series of almond tree paintings, which at first I rendered quite realistically. But after taking a workshop with Vincent di Siderio, a well-known representational painter, who mentioned that he often started a painting by throwing tar on it or rustoleum, I thought, why not approoach this work that way. Apply the paint differently and why not use mettalic paint, after all, Jackson Pollock did.

"Tree in Twilight", 67 inches x 96 inches, oil, enamel, metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2015

“Tree in Twilight”, 67 inches x 96 inches, oil, enamel, metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2015

When I finished “Tree in Twilight” and hung it on my west facing wall, I observed how the light reflected off the surface of the painting and changed every time you moved. It also took on different qualities of light at different times of the day. Immeditately I saw that instead of showing the light of the moment, it was creating a different light each moment. With Monet’ s paintings of the Epte River, he shows you how the light changes moment to moment. With “Tree in Twilight”, the painting itself changes each moment.

"Plated LIght", 72 inches x 30 inches, oil and metallic paint on canvas, ©Leslie Parke 2017

“Plated LIght”, 72 inches x 30 inches, oil and metallic paint on canvas, ©Leslie Parke 2017

From there the work became more and more abstract, but the quality of light and sensation of light remained the subject. Whether I paint representationally or abstractly, I still want the painting to have light emanating from the surface.

 

From Farm to Canvas

From Farm to Canvas

 

I live in a very rural part of New York surrounded by farms. The landscape influences my work, but not always in the ways you might imagine. I pass this farm on a back road to the next town. I have stopped a few times to photograph it. What I really love is how the corn crib looks in front of the silo.

Corn crib in front of sil

Corn crib in front of silo.

It is a curved grid in front of a curved grid. In this photo it appears quite abstract. I love a subject, that is completely real and seems completely abstract.

In the final painting I kept the grid on the right and added a grid from an industrial garage door in New York City on the left. Again it would not surprise me if you could not determine the source of the image. It was the contrast of the flat grid and the curved grid that propelled me. It challenges one’s perception on several levels. The first being that I painted a perfectly representational painting that is utterly abstract. But the flatness on one side and the barely perceptible curve on the other challenges one’s sense of space. Both of these things create a subtle disruption for the viewer.

 

Silo, 64 inches x 94 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2014

“Silo”, 64 inches x 94 inches, oil on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2014

 

Leslie Parke painting Silo

Painting “Silo”

 

 

Conversations with  Giotto

Conversations with Giotto

I’ve been having conversations with Giotto di Bondone [c. 1267 – 1337, born in Florence, Italy] since I was twelve years old and my class studied the Rennaissance. The conversation became obsessive when in 1987 I created a cycle of paintings recreating the paintings of the Arena Chaple on seven shaped canvases, the largest of which is 18 by 24 feet.  [You can see them here.]

"The Last Wall", oil on shaped canvas, 18 feet x 24 feet, 1987

“The Last Wall”, oil on shaped canvas, 18 feet x 24 feet, 1987

There are three stories about Giotto. One that as a child he was drawing a sheep on a rock and Cimabue saw this and was impressed and invited him to become his apprentice. Another is that one day while Cimabue was out Giotto painted a fly on Cimabue’s self portrait that was so realistic Cimabue tried to whisk it away several times. Many years later, the fly becasme a symbol of the artist and was inserted frequently into Dutch still life paintings.

But it is the third story that has occupied me recently.

 Vasari [the chonicler of “Lives of the Artists”] relates that when the Pope sent a messenger to Giotto, asking him to send a drawing to demonstrate his skill, Giotto drew a red circle so perfect that it seemed as though it was drawn using a pair of compasses and instructed the messenger to send it to the Pope. The messenger departed ill pleased, believing that he had been made a fool of. The messenger brought other artists’ drawings back to the Pope in addition to Giotto’s. When the messenger related how he had made the circle without moving his arm and without the aid of compasses the Pope and his courtiers were amazed at how Giotto’s skill greatly surpassed all of his contemporaries.[6] [Wikiwand]

This winter when I started to paint circles, of course I thought of Giotto, but never more so than when I began to draw them on a large canvas.

To do this I sort of dropped into a meditative state. If I thought too much about what I was doing my mind would interfere with my hand.

Conversations with Giotto, 46 inches x 94 inches, silver graphite and blackboard paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2018

Conversations with Giotto, 46 inches x 94 inches, silver graphite and blackboard paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2018

I used silver graphite so that the line would catch the light. Then I did this version:

"Silver LIght" , 46 inches x 94 inches, silver graphite and black gesso on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2018

“Silver LIght” , 46 inches x 94 inches, silver graphite and black gesso on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2018

I wanted a field that was made from a line. I thought, had “the string theory” proven to be true, it might look like this. Here is a close up:

"Silver Light", detail

“Silver Light”, detail

 

“Conversations with Giotto” is currently on view at 3 Pears Gallery in Dorset, Vermont.

3 pears gallery

How an encounter with an 18th century Japanese screen painting found its way into my work.

How an encounter with an 18th century Japanese screen painting found its way into my work.

Several years ago I was crossing the Mall in Washington on my way back to my hotel when I decided I had to duck into the Sackler Gallery, part of the Smithsonian, and see the Asian work there. On display was the Price Collection, on loan from Los Angeles. The first piece I saw as I entered the exhibition was “Pine and Plum Trees in Snowstorm” by Jagyoku Katsu, the 18th Century Japanese artist. The room was dimmed and soft light fell on an enormous screen with branches and falling snow. I felt completely enveloped by the piece. I had both a calm and emotional response to it, it was a feeling that has stayed with me to this day.

Jagyoku Katsu. "Pine and Plum Trees in Snowstorm," a/k/a "Crows and Plum Tree, Rabbits and Pine Trees in Snow ,"

Jagyoku Katsu. “Pine and Plum Trees in Snowstorm,” a/k/a “Crows and Plum Tree, Rabbits and Pine Trees in Snow ,”

Jagyoku Katsu. "Pine and Plum Trees in Snowstorm," a/k/a "Crows and Plum Tree, Rabbits and Pine Trees in Snow ,"

A representation of these screens on a computer cannot begin to give you the feeling of the atmosphere, nor the enormous scale of the pieces. I was impressed by the way so much was conveyed with such an economy of means, and almost no color.

When I get shaken by a work of art like this, it is going to find its way into my work. The piece that was most directly affected by this experience is this one:

"Almond Tree - Light Through Rain", 72 inches x 96 inches, 4-parts,oil, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2017

“Almond Tree – Light Through Rain”, 72 inches x 96 inches, 4- parts, oil, enamel and metallic paint on canvas, © Leslie Parke 2017

I chose to use the motif of the almond tree, which I have been working with for years, perecisely because I am so familiar with it, I can work with it freely.  This time I painted it on several panels to give it the feeling of the screens. My pallette was limited. What is impossible to see here is that I have used reflective paint that makes light bounce off the surface of the canvas and also changes with the light.

The piece is currently at Gremillion and Company, Fine Arts, Inc. in Houston, Texas.

The Start of “The Grid Project”

The Start of “The Grid Project”

All projects have their precedents, and The Grid Project is no exception. For many years I used photography as an aid to my painting. I kept looking for subjects that were more and more abstract. I want the image to take on a new meaning as an abstract construct that has nothing to do with the subject.  But I also want to retain in the image some of the things I explored in my painitngs: transparencies, translucencies, reflections,  and qualities of light.

Here are some samples:

Blue Column, 34 inches x 25.5 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2015

Blue Column, 34 inches x 25.5 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2015

 

"Tutti Fruiti", 34 inches x 24.5 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2015

“Tutti Fruiti”, 34 inches x 24.5 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2015

 

"Taut", 27.5 inches x 34 inches, archival ink-jet print of photograph, edition of 6, © Leslie Parke 2016

“Taut”, 27.5 inches x 34 inches, archival ink-jet print of photograph, edition of 6, © Leslie Parke 2016

I am also interested in structure:

Particle Wave, 25.5 inches x 34 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2016

Particle Wave, 25.5 inches x 34 inches, archival ink-jet print, photograph, © Leslie Parke 2016

 

"Green Fence", 25.5 inches x 34 inches, photograph, archival inkjet print, ©Leslie Parke 2017

“Green Fence”, 25.5 inches x 34 inches, photograph, archival inkjet print, ©Leslie Parke 2017

The question is, “Where do I go from here?” [to be continued]