Below is a continuation of my experience of working with Master Printer Tim Sheesley at Corridor Press in Otego, New York. You can read Part I by clicking here.

Tim in his Spot.

Tim in his spot.

I believe that one of the reasons we were able to accomplish so much in a short period of time was due, in part, to my planning, but in a larger part due to Tim’s organization and economy of movement.  His studio is set up, just as with a short order cook, with everything at hand.  Tim stands in one spot in the studio with two glass slabs in front of him, his inks to his right next to an old Uline catalog that serves as paper on which to clean his palette knives, rags below him, solvent to his right, the press behind him, and printing paper to his far left.  He didn’t move more than three feet all day.

Old Uline catalog used as scrap paper.

Old Uline catalog used as scrap paper.

I, on the other hand, walked miles, as I found a spot across from him to watch as he mixed colors and then moved to the other side of the room to watch the print being rolled with ink.

Tim Inking Plate

Tim Inking Plate

Tim and I worked through all the color permutations.  There were several points where we would have loved to have stopped,  because the results were so beautiful.  It was time to add the black that depicts the branches. This was the final step, the last layer of color. He pulled the first print and THUD! Disaster! Worst print of the day.

Tom looked worried and disappointed.  I think he was afraid that I’d be devastated.  Instead, I felt that the print confirmed what I had felt ever since seeing the first tentative proofs weeks earlier  —  the black just didn’t work.  In paint and even in the computer  generated image, the black acted like a gestalt – stunning and integrated into the overall image.  In the print, the black sat on top of the page both dwarfing and destroying the colors beneath.  It might as well have been a black and white print.  Tim and I both thought that switching to a middle gray would accomplish what I was after.  Even within the gray you can have a range of color, and I wanted the gray skewed toward lavender.

Pantone

Pantone book, oil paint sample and computer generated image.

This is when Tim finally pulled out the Pantone book. This is the printer’s Bible. It contains every color he can mix with his inks, and gives him the formula to do so. I flipped through the color samples and pointed to the color I wanted.  The improvement was immediate and dramatic.  It quickly became apparent that the other color versions of the print could also use gray, but the value of the gray would have to be adjusted to work with the other color versions.

Getting exactly the right shade of gray (don’t even go there) was as much work as determining the other color combinations.

As we printed each layer we were both delighting in the detail. But here is the truly confounding result: it seemed that the print would have to be viewed  from about 18 inches for them to be appreciated.  That is exactly the opposite effect of my paintings, which look best when viewed from across the room.  The paintings look painterly close up (down right messy, in fact), but at a certain distance they snap into focus and look almost photo realistic.

When we added the gray to the print Tim and I found ourselves backing up across the studio.  The prints were still reading well from twenty five feet away.  We managed to produce the same effect in the print as in my paintings.

Once we saw these qualities in one print, it was a matter of bringing that effect to all the prints.  Sometimes remarkably small adjustments made the difference between reading the print as color and reading it as light.  This is where the skill and integrity of a Master Printer makes all the difference.  The work is demanding and exhausting.  At the eleventh hour, Tim was still willing to mix one more color and make one more adjustment so that I could see if we could perfect the print.

A great Master Printer hangs in there with you to the end. When your energy flags, he shores you up, so that you can produce the best work possible.  Tim told me over and over that it was about my vision, and he did everything in his power to make that happen.

Tim Sheesley

Tim Sheesley

 

 

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